Texas Employment Law Question: Give examples of : What is the difference between 'exempt' and 'non-exempt'?

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    3 Responses to “Texas Employment Law Question: Give examples of : What is the difference between 'exempt' and 'non-exempt'?”

    1. Judy Says:

      Exempt and non-exempt refer to whether the federal Fair Labor Standards Act regarding overtime applies to you. It does apply to most people, and depends both on what your job responsibilities are, and your salary. Someone in management who makes over around $24,000 a year is not covered, and certain high-paid professionals are exempt also.

      See http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/wages/overtimepay.htm and links from that page for more detailed information.

    2. Cas Says:

      There a two major distinctions between exempt and non-exempt employees:

      1) Are they paid hourly (non-exempt) or are they salaried (exempt)?
      2) Do they supervise anyone? Yes is exempt, no is non-exempt.

    3. Mel Says:

      Exempt means that you are exempt from overtime requirements and non-exempt means that you must be paid overtime if you work over 40 hours/week (and in some states over 8 hours/day as well, but TX isn’t one of them.)

      For more, visit http://www.dol.gov.