How do wills work? Can I make my own, or will it not count?

Ok so i don’t really have anything to give to anyone, but how do wills work? Do you have to go through a lawyer or some other legal person or can I write my own? If I write my own, does it have to be signed by an offical or have some sort of seal on it to be legit? Thanks!
I don’t feel like dying, but..you never know.
thanks! I didn’t realize it was that simple

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4 Responses to “How do wills work? Can I make my own, or will it not count?”

  1. Mr Placid Says:

    What "Hugo" is referring to is called a "holographic" will. Holographic wills are valid in only about half of the states. In the rest of the states, you would need a "traditional" will. A traditional will requires two witnesses. You can still do a traditional will yourself using one of those do-it-yourself kits that are available in office supply stores or sometimes online from your state’s bar association website. But, if you have sizable assets, a lawyer’s help is recommended.

    And, the will needs to be kept somewhere where it can be found after you die. So, don’t keep it in a secret hiding place that nobody knows about.

  2. sensible_man Says:

    You can purchase "basic" will forms at Office Supply stores. You then fill them out, take it to a Notary Public along with witnesses and sign it. It is better if you file the finished will with the local court.

  3. Shotgun Pete Says:

    To make it seem more official, and to make sure it will be uphelp, make sure you give it to a lawyer…

    But if you write it using ketchup on your window, that is still counted as a will as long as you have signed it.

  4. Hugo Says:

    You don’t need anything fancy for a will. If you write it entirely in your own handwriting and sign it, it is a valid will. It would help if you had your signature notarized but it is not necessary. For example, if you were buried in an earthquake, you could write your will on anything and it will be upheld.